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Author Nancy J. Cohen discusses the writing process and life as a Florida resident.

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Posts Tagged ‘publishing’

Editors Roundtable at SleuthFest

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on March 21, 2014

We continue with my recap of panels and workshops at SleuthFest. These are my interpretations and notes, and any misstatement is my error. Photos are viewable from my Facebook Page. Like my page, then click on Photos, Albums, and SleuthFest 2014.

Editors Roundtable with Neil S. Nyren, Shannon Jamieson Vazquez, Deni Dietz, Matt Martz and moderated by P.J. Parrish

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How have the changes in publishing affected you?

Matt said social media tools can take up a lot of time and become distracting. However, electronic submissions are great. “Queries written like tweets don’t fly.” Be professional in your queries.

Shannon mentioned that e-mail has revolutionized multiple submissions like the Xerox machine did earlier. E-books are growing.

Neil said e-books are a big change in our business. If you plan to save self-publish, please make sure the book is ready. Respect the reader. Hire a professional copy editor to edit your work and a professional artist to design your jackets.

Kristy (aka P.J. Parrish) warned listeners to be careful of typos especially if you get your backlist scanned.

Is the editing process gone, or how has it changed?

Matt said, if an editor has to dig in deep to line edit, then he probably shouldn’t be working with you. An editor works on tone, pacing, developmental issues, and broader strokes.

Shannon said there’s no one way to do it. “I red-line the hell out of a manuscript. We’re working to make the book the best it can be.” She’ll spend at least two weeks on a manuscript. Altogether, a book might take her five to six months for the different stages.

Neil gives the manuscript a complete first read and then sends the author notes on what works and what doesn’t.

Deni said historical mysteries take longer to work on due to the research involved. She works with three associate editors. She advises writers to learn your toolbar and track changes. The days of sticky notes on manuscripts are over. Formatting is very important.

Also, there is a misperception that if it’s wrong, an editor will fix it. That is untrue. Deni will do brief edits as she reads through the work and then sends it back to the writer for corrections. She believes that if someone doesn’t show you what’s wrong, how are you going to learn?

If the writing is dazzling, but the story is not compelling, Neil said that’s called an “MFA” [Master of Fine Arts] manuscript.

Where do most books fall apart?

Shannon says this happens for her between pages 1 and 150. The book gets off to a good start but gets tangled in subplots, or else the story peters out. Or the solution isn’t what she’d expected.

Deni said sometimes this happens in the middle or at the end because the writer is anxious to finish. Or else there’s a Too Stupid To Live moment. But that’s fixable, so don’t despair.

Neil looks to see if the author has control of the book from the very beginning. He says a good agent should know an editor’s particular taste.

You will learn more by writing a book, putting it in a drawer, and starting a new one than by working on that same manuscript for years.

How often do books come out?

Shannon said romances are at the forefront of three month back-to-back book releases but not mysteries. Deni said her house puts out one book a year due to reviewers’ lead time.

Short stories and novellas are making a comeback with e-books, according to Shannon. Nobody is buying short story collections, but they can be used as teasers for book-length novels. Neil pointed out pricing on a short story could be $.99 or free, while a novella can be sold for $2.99.

What about print-only deals?

Matt said it’s not much of a partnership if the author retains e-book rights.

Neil adds, “We’re giving up the potential, so for most people print-only deals won’t be a possibility.”

Deni said Five Star will not take a self-published book.

Shannon said they would consider buying e-book rights from self-published authors, but you would have to take your book down at the online sites where you have it on sale.

Coming Next: Kobo and ACX

Posted in Business of Writing, Conferences, Fiction Writing, The Writing Life | Tagged: , , , , | 4 Comments »

Small Press Does Not Mean Small Editing

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on January 2, 2014

Small Press Does Not Mean Small Editing by Victoria Pinder

I started out my writing journey and went to RWA Nationals after finishing my first novel. I learned my writing sucked. I tried to fix it, but I’ve never sold those earlier books. To me, life is about growing and moving forward. I wrote more and decided that I had enough of waiting a few years with nothing happening. I decided to self-pub, and I chose a faux name writing as Greta Buckle. Victoria, my name, was reserved for traditional publishing. Then I discovered self-publishing wasn’t the only alternative path. Small press was another viable option.

It’s a relief to go small. And I’m glad I chose this route.   Mything You

I paid someone to edit Mything You. I love the story, but that editing wasn’t nearly as brutal as the Zoastra Affair. I rewrote that novel so many times my head spins. My editor corrected me on so much that my writing will never be the same. The growth and care I received from Soul Mate Publishing is something I’m grateful for experiencing. These were real editors who told me I needed to work on my craft, and I wasn’t paying for their services. If my editor said “rewrite,” I had no choice. I had to think deeper. Change. Say yes.

And I couldn’t ignore it.

Publishing is a business. Amazon is so profiting off indie authors, and Amazon cares more about Amazon than it does me. Play the game and play it well. But let’s not forget there are people out there also looking to make money WHILE publishing a good book that is not Amazon. I’ve learned more from editing than I did in a year of independent publishing. And I can focus on writing, not everything else it takes until the media giant takes 100% of all profits.

Small Publishers can answer the phone, and listen and help. Publishing is a business and it’s not all about you controlling everything. What are you willing to trade? I want my time to write. Don’t jump into one type of publishing because it’s easier than the other. There are pros and cons to everything. With publishers, there is time to write.

The Zoastra Affair
, December 2013, Soul Mate Publishing
Chaperoning Paris, 2014, Soul Mate Publishing
Borrowing the Doctor, 2014, Soul Mate Publishing
Mything the Throne, 2014, Double Dragon ebooks.
Electing Love, 2014, Soul Mate Publishing

And more books are out there at the moment.

I’ve created a list of small press and e-publishers from a variety of sources. I’ve put it on my site, as a tribute to Nancy’s awesomeness. Go here: http://victoriapinder.com/?page_id=1411

Oh, and special thanks to Nancy Cohen. She’s the newly elected President of Florida Chapter Mystery Writers of America as well as Vice President of Communications for Florida Romance Writers. I just chose to be Vice President of Programs for FRW, and I can’t imagine where she has the time. But besides all that, she’s a good person with a positive attitude. She’s one of the people I’m most thankful for in real life for knowing. She’s amazing.

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The Zoastra Affair by Victoria Pinder   The Zoastra Affair
Published by Soul Mate Publishing
Science Fiction Romance

YouTube Trailer:
http://youtu.be/Buah-LGT4tA

Blurb:

A hundred years from now, Earth is a trading partner with alien beings, mostly humanoid. However, going into space brought forth an unknown enemy who attacks Earth at will.

The Zoastra are part of the Earthseekers, an organization originally designed to go into space. Its new mission is to find Earth’s enemies.

Ariel is stuck on a Victorian planet and steals Grace’s body and life to get off the planet. Grace must get her body back before Ariel bonds with Grace’s husband, Peter. Then there is Cross, the man on a mission to find those who killed his family. Ariel is attracted to Cross, but she’s stolen someone’s life.

Excerpt:

 I’m going to have to steal someone else’s body to get out of here.

“Ariel, are you listening?”

Ariel Transcender stared dumbfounded at the mother superior of her prison, a/k/a Aulnale School for Orphans. “Yes, mistress.”

She had no idea what happened, though she pasted a fake simpering smile of appreciation on her face. Ms. Rochelle walked away.

A few minutes later, Ariel looked out the window again, tuning out Rochelle’s mind numbing lecture on what was proper behavior when near a man. The boarding home on this planet gave the stupidest lectures of the galaxy. Her lips curled into a sneer. Women were not excited to be bound to men.

Could I do this to someone else? Do I have any other choice?

Lenchena, the teenage girl who’d stolen her adult body and taken off on Ariel’s ship, needed to be found. And Ariel refused to listen to the daily drivel about always listening to a man.

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About the Author:

clip_image004Victoria Pinder grew up in Irish Catholic Boston before moving to the Miami sun. She’s worked in engineering, after passing many tests proving how easy Math came to her. Then hating her life at the age of twenty four, she decided to go to law school. Four years later, after passing the bar and practicing very little, she realized that she hates the practice of law. She refused to one day turn 50 and realize she had nothing but her career and hours at a desk. After realizing she needed change, she became a high school teacher. Teaching is rewarding, but writing is a passion.

During all this time, she always wrote stories to entertain herself or calm down. Her parents are practical minded people demanding a job, and Victoria spent too many years living other people’s dreams, but when she sat down to see what skill she had that matched what she enjoyed doing, writing became so obvious. The middle school year book when someone wrote in it that one day she’d be a writer made sense when she turned thirty.

When she woke up to what she wanted, the dream of writing became so obvious. She dreams of writing professionally, where her barista can make her coffee and a walk on the beach can motivate her tales. Contemporary romances are just fun to write. She’s always thinking who’s getting hurt and whose story is next on the list to fall in love. Victoria’s love of writing has kept her centered and focused through her many phases, and she’s motivated to write many stories.

Member of Florida Romance Writers; Contemporary Romance; Fantasy, Futuristic and Paranormal chapter of RWA; and Savvy Authors.

Visit Victoria online at:

Website: http://www.victoriapinder.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Victoria-Pinder-also-writing-as-Greta-Buckle/294685373900979
Twitter: http://twitter.com/victoriapinder
Tumblr: victoriapinder.tumblr.com
Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/victoriapinder/
Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=200859737&trk=hb_tab_pro_top
Google+ https://plus.google.com/105161432419802350109/posts/p/pub

Posted in Business of Writing, Self-Publishing, The Writing Life | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Am I Ready To Publish?

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on January 29, 2013

AM I READY TO PUBLISH? By Terry Ambrose

A new author recently asked me what steps she should take to publish the book she’d just finished writing. My first reaction was to wonder what draft number she’d completed. How much editing had she done? Then, how many independent readers had she found?      Terry AbroseBio

It was more than 25 years ago when I wrote my first book. I thought it was really good…my wife thought it was good…at least, that’s what she said…and, yes, we are still married. Then, I joined my first critique group, a small band of seasoned writers who’d been writing and traditionally publishing mysteries for many years. Did they dislike it? No, they hated it. Adverbs, adjectives, too much exposition, not enough action…I thought the list would never end. Undaunted, I went back and rewrote again and again because there were no other options. At one point, I became desperate to better understand their critiques and used three colored highlighters to mark my draft. Blue was for exposition, yellow for dialog, and pink for action. Imagine my surprise when my page turned into a sea of blue with smatterings of yellow and pink. It was time to rewrite—again.

Over the years the need for those highlighters gradually faded, however, my need for solid critiques from tough readers hasn’t lessened. One of the best things writers can do is to join a critique group. But, assuming you’ve already done that, how do you get that completed manuscript read and edited?

Pay for an editor

There are thousands of “editors” out there who will tailor their services to what you’re looking for. A good editor is worth every penny; a bad one, a waste of money. One option for checking out a prospective editor is Preditors and Editors (pred-ed.com). Another option is to just ask other writers, get a name, then call or email the editor and conduct an interview. After all, this is a job and you’re the boss. If the editor tells you that she worked with someone on a particular book, go find a copy and look for an acknowledgement.

Manuscript swap                                 Terry Ambrose

If you don’t have the money for a professional editor, or if you want others’ opinions before you start spending money, think about a manuscript swap. The easiest way to find people who would be willing to swap manuscripts is to go where they hang out. Today, that can be as simple as joining a writing organization such as Sisters in Crime or Romance Writers of America. Recognize, however, that a swap is a swap. It means you’ll be doing a lot of editing of other people’s work, which is good because seeing other people’s mistakes makes it easier to spot our own.

Find beta readers

The most difficult challenge of all will be to build a network of people who will read your work and critique it before it goes to publication. This network doesn’t include your mom; she’s going to love what you wrote. It doesn’t include your best friend because only one of two things can happen: you’ll lose a friend or you’ll just get a “nice job” for feedback. I’m not sure there is a best way to find beta readers. It seems to be one part pure luck and one part perseverance. However, I recently discovered a friend who has read both of my books and considers herself an excellent proofreader and critic of crime fiction. Guess what? She’s getting the next manuscript to review before publication and a signed copy of the book afterwards as a thank you for helping me out.

One of my favorite questions lately to ask writers is, how do you want readers to remember you? Do you want to be remembered as a writer who put out lots of mediocre books or a few good ones? I’d rather be in the latter group. In the end, I think the extra time is worth it.

How do you feel about the quality of books being published? Is it going down? Do you have tips about how to get a manuscript reviewed that I haven’t covered here?
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About Terry Ambrose

Terry started out skip tracing and collecting money from deadbeats and quickly learned that liars come from all walks of life. He never actually stole a car, but sometimes hired big guys with tow trucks and a penchant for working in the dark when “negotiations” failed.

In Terry’s new release, License to Lie, a criminologist and a con artist learn that with $5 million and their lives on the line, you can never trust a soul…even your own. T. Jefferson Parker, author of The Jaguar and The Border Lords said, “License to Lie is fast and well written, almost sure to satisfy discerning readers of thrillers.”
Learn more about Terry on his website at terryambrose.com or on his Facebook author page at facebook.com/suspense.writer.

Posted in Business of Writing, The Writing Life | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 24 Comments »

When Are Revisions Done?

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on December 7, 2012

Newbie writers often ask, how do you know when to stop revising and send in the work? There’s no easy answer as each of us goes through our own self-editing process. Revisions are never done. Every time you read through your work, more things pop up to fix. So when should you quit? When the story is as good as you can make it for now, and you’ll plotz if you have to go through it one more time. But all is not lost. You’ll get another chance to make corrections and tweak your phrasing during the editing phase.

Finishing your manuscript and doing second or third drafts is only part of the equation. Once your story is finished for good, you need to go back to your synopsis. Why? The story probably branched out in new directions since you began, and you need to update this important marketing tool.

You should also check through the submission guidelines and format your work accordingly. Different publishers prefer different fonts and line spacing. So get it right before you submit anything.

Check your front and back end materials to make sure everything is there. Besides the title page, in the front may go any endorsements you’ve gathered, dedications and acknowledgements, world building details like maps or casts of characters. At the end go your biography, author’s note if any, and any bonus materials like recipes in a culinary cozy. Again, see if your publisher requires anything else.

Once you have accomplished all these tasks, then you are ready to submit. Does the publisher want you to attach any ancillary materials, like cover art sheets or permissions or cover copy blurbs? This may come before or after a sale. Be certain you have these forms filled out.

Then write your cover letter and send the submission.

Here’s a quick checklist:

· Proofread your final draft for timeline consistency, character continuity, repetitions, word choices, spelling.
· Verify any research as necessary.
· Check all loose ends to make sure you’ve solved them by the story’s finale. You may want to review your plotting notes to see if you have left anything out.
· If a series, include a hook for the next story.
· Write a reader discussion guide during your final draft.
· Jot down blog topics for your blog tour.
· Rewrite your synopsis to match the finished story.
· Format your manuscript according to publisher guidelines.
· Prepare requested ancillary materials to attach with your submission.
· Submit your work and cross your fingers.

I am in this phase now which is why I’m not blogging too often, posting on FB, etc. Getting the book done amidst the holiday frenzy is taking my total concentration. I’ve gone through the manuscript, so now I have to format it to the publisher’s guidelines and fill out the required forms. Then I’ll send my baby out into the world.

Is there anything you would add to this checklist?

Posted in Business of Writing, Writing Craft | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »

Writers as Publishers

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on November 13, 2011

Shannon Aviles from More Than Publicity gave a talk at a recent meeting of Florida Romance Writers advising authors who self-publish their work to think like publishers. This means authors have to “pull your vision out of the box” where we’ve sat for so long while agents and the Big Six publishers tell us what to do. “Think broader and wider.” She advises authors to do brand marketing, which is what drives sales. “Learn how to become CEO of your own business.” She says technology drives consumer power and predicts that e-book sales will supersede print sales. Authors should take back whatever rights they can get. Brand marketers are also trend watchers. Keep an eye on world news, the economy, upcoming films. Bench marketing is another term Shannon discussed. It means watching what the competition is doing.

Authors believe self-publishing is as simple as putting a book up on Amazon, but read the fine print. Amazon is telling you how to price your product. They control the terms and can change them on a whim. Authors on Amazon become little fish in a big sea. How do you get noticed? “Don’t put all your balls in Amazon’s court because they have a big game plan,” and you’re not in it. Now they’re even loaning books out for free.          Nov 2011

Meanwhile, distribution has narrowed as distributors, chain and indie bookstores have gone out of business. However, Lightning Source through Ingrams has worldwide distribution so this is better than Createspace for self-pubbed authors who want to offer their books in print. But you’ll need to get an EIN number for Ingrams (business tax number).

The Big 6 publishers use the agency model to price their ebooks, while smaller presses and epubs use the wholesale model. In the agency model, the publisher sets the price.

Shannon advises choosing a professional name for your publishing company and registering it as an LLC. You should come up with a brand for your house. Work out a business plan and a long-term strategy. Consider your launch week but aim for longevity. Make adjustments as necessary along the road.

An author’s goal should be long-term sustained selling, not an immediate focus on a quick sale by lowering the book price to $.99. Long-term gain is what matters, not constantly offering your books on sale for short-term hikes in rankings and numbers. “America is a sales hog.” We’re used to everything being on sale. But focus on your long-range plans. If one strategy isn’t working, change it. Always reassess your status and make adjustments accordingly. For example, launch your book at the regular price and watch the sales velocity for a six week period.

Books-A-Million is growing and launching new stores because they have a marketing strategy.

Publicity, promotions, public relations, and media relations do not drive sales. Press doesn’t make you famous unless you’re already famous. Don’t waste your money on press kits and tchotchkes. DO send your book, with a professional cover, to reviewers.

Disclaimer: This is my interpretation of what I heard. It may not be totally accurate but it’s my best conclusion from my notes.

Posted in Business of Writing, The Writing Life | Tagged: , , , , , | 11 Comments »

The Writer’s Brain

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on October 12, 2011

Can you turn off your writer’s brain? Check out my blog post today over at http://killzoneauthors.blogspot.com and leave a comment!

Posted in The Writing Life | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Transitioning Between Book Projects

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on June 27, 2011

Do you have a hard time jumping from one series to another when you’re writing in different genres? How do you fade out one set of characters and their world from your mind and switch to another?

I just made the transition from a contemporary mystery to a paranormal romance. It didn’t happen overnight. I took a few weeks off to catch up on emails and promo activities, to work on the book trailer for my next release, and to focus on household matters. But as those things receded from my priority list, the empty space in my head told me it was time to start the next book.

writer

Although I had a rudimentary synopsis and plotting notes and already knew the background from the previous two volumes in the series, I didn’t know my main characters well enough to start writing the story. So first, I filled in my character development sheets and my romantic conflict chart. Next, I watched a couple of movies that have scenes in Las Vegas where the story begins.

My synopsis didn’t seem complete enough, nor was the villain clearly defined, so I added in some complications to the plot. I’ll rely on my critique group to tell me if the story flows logically and if the emotional highs and lows of the romance are adequate. At this point, though, I am ready to begin writing.

After a hesitant start, the story picks up. I finish the first chapter, eighteen pages long. This is rough draft only. I’ll keep writing daily at a steady pace without looking back until I hit the finish line. Then I’ll spend a few weeks on polishing and revisions.

So here’s my advice on how to transition between projects:

• Take a break and recharge your creative batteries

• Review your plotting notes on the new project

• Develop your characters

• Perform any necessary research on the setting

• Write the synopsis

• Begin Chapter One

It’s okay if you don’t know how your characters will react yet. I only learn that when I’m writing the story and see them in action. That’s when story magic comes into play and your subconscious takes your story in unexpected directions. You can revise your synopsis later; for now, just keep writing.

Seasoned writers, please share your experiences. How do you get one book out of your head and the next story simmering in your mind?

Posted in Writing Craft | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

Calibre is Cool!

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on June 23, 2011

Thanks to my author friend, Carol Stephenson  (http://www.carolstephenson.com), I have just discovered Calibre!

If you have an e-book reader, this software program will convert files to your reader’s format. Go here for a free download: http://calibre-ebook.com/download

What could be a more fabulous find of the day?

Why do you need this? As an example, I wanted some of the free books offered this week over at Carina Press:

Today’s FREE BOOK is Blue Galaxy by Diane Dooley
Just type in the promo code GALAXYFREE at checkout
http://ebooks.carinapress.com/ContentDetails.htm?ID=827CC21D-6F33-437A-977B-B0F291B70367

Friday’s FREE BOOK is Friendly Fire by Megan Hart
Just type in the promo code FRIENDLYFREE at checkout
http://ebooks.carinapress.com/ContentDetails.htm?ID=E1466469-DB0C-404F-A0AA-3491BB9E9B14

The only problem is that these books are offered in ePub format, and I have a Kindle. What to do? Download Calibre! It converts files into the format of your e-book reader and sends them to your device. It wasn’t hard to figure out how to do it, and now I have two new books on my Kindle to read. I can’t wait to see what else I can do with this program. I’ve heard other writers talking about it but finally had the time to check it out. Until there’s a standard format that suits all e-book devices, this program may prove invaluable.

For those of you who already have this software program, please share your insights!

Posted in Business of Writing, The Writing Life | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

A Sad Day for Borders

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on February 19, 2011

Today is a sad day for Borders and for everyone in the publishing industry. It’s the first day of their going out of business sale after declaring bankruptcy. I went to the store and saw a long checkout line snaking all the way from the front to the back, people’s arms filled with books. Where had they been during normal business hours? If all these people had come into the store then, maybe Borders wouldn’t be having financial woes today.

Magazines were forty percent off so I started there. Then I roamed the aisles, picking out a few things I books2 might not have bought otherwise. People loaded all kinds of things into their baskets: children’s books, puzzles, gifts, hardcover novels, novelty notebooks, and more. I can understand how adults may become more comfortable reading an e-book on their Kindle, but kids will never lose the pleasure of thumbing through a pop-up book or a picture book. Do we expect to keep our children entertained via the television, computer, or handheld device? Children need to have books at home if they are to develop a love for learning and reading.

Where do we expect to browse magazines if not at the big chain bookstores? Will we have to subscribe online? I like leafing through magazines, cutting out pictures and recipes. How will I satisfy this need if I can’t browse the magazine racks and pick out issues that appeal to me?

For authors, we lose the experience of readers browsing the new release table and spotting our catchy book cover. How can we attract their attention online? Reader review sites? Genre niche sites? If we are not already a known name, do we have a chance at all?

Our choices to buy a physical print book in person will now be narrowed to Barnes & Noble, for however long they last, and to the local independent bookstores. Supermarkets and discount chains are viable alternatives but their selection is often limited to bestsellers. Will we be forced to hunt for more reads online, increasing our time spent in front of the computer? Book reviews and word-of-mouth recommendations will be just as important as ever. But things are changing, and how those are delivered is changing too. We’ll have to look online for recommendations. Or maybe we’ll let sites like Amazon recommend titles for us based on our previous purchases like they do now.

As I stood in the checkout line, I heard two opposing points of view. The man from behind said that e-books are going to take over because e-books are cheaper and it’s easier for people to download them. His female companion shook her head. “ I like to hold a book, and I like to smell it. I’ll never stop wanting to have a book in my hands.”

Posted in The Writing Life | Tagged: , , , , | 10 Comments »

Collectibles

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on January 20, 2011

You can learn a lot about your hero or heroine from the knickknacks found in their living quarters. Perhaps your heroine presents a tough exterior but indulges herself by wearing lacy silk lingerie. Or your hero, who seems a sensitive type, harbors an assortment of evil-looking knives in his drawer. This one might work especially well in a mystery. For inspiration, check out those unsolicited catalogs you get in the mail or take a stroll through the mall.

What are some of the items your protagonist might collect? Books and/or magazines? Be specific. Are they fiction or nonfiction? What genre or topic? Are they strewn about the cocktail table for show, or are they askew on an unmade bed? Are the pages ragged, the corners folded in, or are they in pristine condition?

Maybe your heroine collects porcelain figurines. Are they animals, children, or couples embracing? What secret longing do they represent? Or your macho hero owns a collection of chess sets. What does this say about him?

Here are some other ideas: embroidered throw pillows, letter openers, music boxes, sports memorabilia, clocks, model airplanes. If art adorns the walls, are they watercolors, oils, or photography? What do the subjects depict?

Decorative plates, antique jewelry, and vintage clothing are popular items for collectors. So are fairy tale characters, wizards, angels, and unicorns.

Look at the items surrounding you at home and think about your hero’s domain. Why does he collect a particular item? Does it express a hidden desire, reveal a facet of his personality, or expose a secret sentiment? Even owning nothing of a personal nature makes a statement in itself. Have fun delving into the intricacies of your protagonists’ hobbies so you can describe the collection through their eyes. It will give an added dimension to your story.

Posted in Writing Craft | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

 
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