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Author Nancy J. Cohen discusses the writing process and life as a Florida resident.

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SELF-PUBLISHING

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on November 22, 2009

Self-publishing is rising in popularity these days. It used to be that books vetted by agents and accepted by editors went through quality control measures. In other words, the writing was up to professional standards and the story had a special zing to it that made an editor take notice. But if any Joe can publish, how is a reader to distinguish between what’s classy and what’s crap?

I have no problem with self-publishing under certain circumstances. For example, someone wants to publish their memoirs to share with her family. Or perhaps an expert in a subject wants to publish a nonfiction book to sell on the speaking circuit. I’ve considered going this route for a book my father wrote concerning his hitchhiking adventures in 1939. Thus in some circles, self-publishing is acceptable. Even legitimately published fiction authors may find themselves suddenly orphaned without an editor, or their line closes, or their option book isn’t renewed. They may view self-publishing as a viable option after a series of rejections by the major pub houses. In this case, their writing will be polished enough that quality won’t be lost.

In fact, why not bypass a publisher altogether when you can convert your own files and submit them electronically for publication as an e-book or POD (print-on-demand)? Maybe this will be the wave of the future, especially if print books go the way of the music CD. Then who needs a publishing house or an agent? Well, I’ll tell you. Authors who want the distribution and support of a royalty-paying publisher. Readers who want quality control so they don’t pick up a book by Joe Schmoe who has no clue how to write. Booksellers who need to be able to return unsold books to the publisher. Change is in the wind, but writers still need traditional publishers if they want to make some money at this career. They still need agents to help them find a publisher for their work. And publishers still need authors, for who else will write the stories of tomorrow?

These publishers may produce ebook or POD formats, but their editors still scour through manuscripts looking for polished work and a unique voice. In other words, they are selective. Self-publishing skirts this process, dissolves the barriers, and lets anyone have a voice. For experienced writers, this isn’t a problem. Their work will still be up to professional standards. But how is a reader to tell the difference between their book and the enthusiastic aspiring author who has no clue about pacing, characterization, and plot? Herein lies the danger of self-publishing, that bad books will flood the marketplace and turn off readers. And if it’s one thing all writers want, it is for readership to increase, not diminish.

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4 Responses to “SELF-PUBLISHING”

  1. Suzanne Rossi said

    So true, Nancy. All of us have hopes and dreams about being a published author. For some of us, it’s come true. My fear is that impatient, new writers will not even try to go the traditional route, therefore never learning the mechanics of writing as you described. Self-publishing works for some who are savvy enough about the business to do it correctly. Vanity presses help no one except themselves leaving the new author bewildered, depressed, and poorer. I also am considering self-pubishing for a very specialized book. My late mother-in-law kept all her husband’s letters from overseas during WWII. He wrote everyday with the exception of one–the day his recon plane was shot down over France. My husband’s uncle goes the self-pubbing route often with non-fiction aircraft related books. It works for him. But for fiction writers? Very problematic.

  2. I agree, Suzanne. Self-publishing can work for established fiction writers or authors of other works, but for newbies, it doesn’t teach how to properly edit or offer the feedback of a trained professional.

  3. You have a strong point, Nancy. Newbies on the publishing industry should be properly trained how to write effectively, to apply proper pacing, and to understand that their work is subject to professional standards.

  4. Unfortunately, many of these newbies lose patience with the publishing process and forge ahead to publish their own work of fiction. The verdict will come from readers, who either embrace their story as a refreshing find or disgard it because it’s poorly written.

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