Nancy's Notes From Florida

Author Nancy J. Cohen discusses the writing process and life as a Florida resident.

Archive for August, 2010

Support Your Favorite Author

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on August 30, 2010

TEN WAYS TO SUPPORT YOUR FAVORITE AUTHOR

How can you keep your favorite authors writing the series you love so much?  How can you inspire them when the publishing world dives and drags them along for the ride?

Here are some ways you can help besides showing up at a booksigning, ordering their book in the library, or giving a copy of their book as a gift.

  • Post reviews of their books on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Goodreads, Facebook, Shelfari, your blog, and anywhere else that takes reader reviews. And while you’re at it, give their book five star ratings.
  • Tag their book sites on Amazon.  Scroll down on the book page to where it says Tags Customers Associate with this Product and put in your tags, i.e. keywords, or click Agree With These Tags.
  • “Like” the author’s posts on Facebook
  • Tweet their blog posts or other sites to your friends and retweet their Twitter posts.
  • Write them a message of support.  Authors need inspiration and you, the reader, are the reason why we write. 
  • If you’re really dedicated, lead a discussion group about their books.
  • Mention their books on Amazon Listmania and other favorites lists
  • Request bookmarks and pass them out to people you know who like to read.
  • Suggest their book for a book club discussion.
  • Provide links online to their website, blog, and Facebook fan page.

 What would you add?  As an author, can you make any other suggestions?  As a reader, what can the author do for you in return?

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The Big Dark Moment

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on August 25, 2010

In a romance, the Big Dark Moment is the crucial juncture when all seems lost between the hero and heroine.  He stomps away and she strides in the opposite direction, and it seems as though they will never be together again.  How can they overcome their insurmountable obstacles?  Will love triumph in the end?

Of course it will.  The prerequisite for a romance is the HEA  (Happy Ever After) ending. But for this HEA to have emotional impact, our characters first must experience the painful Big Dark Moment when their relationship seems hopeless.

Tossing a cog in the story wheel isn’t the way to go about it.  This confrontation must arise naturally from the character’s internal conflicts.  Take Paz and Jen from my WIP.

elegant woman Jen is a fashion designer who looks as svelte as her models. For years, she struggled for parental approval.  Growing up in a wealthy family, she internalized her mother’s superficial values that appearance matters.  But she yearns for a man who can appreciate her for herself and not for her looks or money.                                                   

Drift Lord warrior Paz Hadar isn’t the rich businessman she’d expected to snag, but he brings out her strength and resourcefulness and admires her bravery.  Yet when she tries to discuss their future together, he clams up.  He’s planned for nothing beyond this mission, and so she figures he’ll leave her in the end.  Paz, in turn, gets angry when she pushes him for his plans, believing she can’t accept him for the person he is and wants to mold him into the ideal man. And if he’s not good enough for her, forget it. And so he stomps off.  Jen feels he doesn’t care enough about her feelings to truly confide in him.                                  angry eyes

 Thus they go their separate ways, until each one realizes how much they need the other.  But by then, Paz seeks to prove himself by attacking the enemy all on his own.  Jen rushes to his side, but it’s too late.  He’s been…well, we don’t want to give the story away.

sad woman

 

 

 

Action and reaction propels the story forward, leading to the Big Dark Moment and the final confrontation with the villain. And when Paz and Jen finally commit to each other as we know they will, we’ll heave a deep sigh of satisfaction.  Sour before sweet, despair before joy.  It makes the ending all the more Happy Ever After.  

               wedding couple

 

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Favorite Mystery Films

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on August 24, 2010

Favorite Films for Mystery Fans is the topic of my guest blog today at http://bit.ly/aCYn78

Leave a comment for a chance to win a free book in my August blog commenter drawing.

What are YOUR favorite mystery movies?

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FINISHING YOUR BOOK

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on August 20, 2010

When you’re nearing the end of your book, do you tend to race ahead?  I have 25 pages to go in my WIP before reaching my required word count, and I’m beginning to think I might go over.  I still have several scenes to go to reach a satisfactory conclusion. While I’m tempted to rush through to the finish line, this is actually when I need to slow down to bring all my plot threads together. So here is my advice for what you should do when approaching The End.

 Take Your Time                                                                                     

You’re sick of working on this story.  You just want to finish.  You’ll layer in more details later.

STOP.  You need to slow down and work your way through each scene as the story logically unfolds.  It may be tedious and make you grind your teeth, but remember why you’re writing in the first place.  You love the process.  So enjoy the storytelling and live with your characters a while longer until their tale is done.

Tie Up All The Loose Ends

If you juggle several plot threads in a complex storyline like I do, you’ve either lost track of them or you keep detailed spreadsheets and notes to guide you down the track. Make sure you have covered all your footprints. Often I may have to take care of this on my second read-through.  On the first revision, I’ll write down questions that spring to mind about the story from the reader’s viewpoint. Or I’ll do a plotting board as the story progresses, and these questions will be in a different colored ink from the main plot.  You’ll want to resolve these questions by the story’s end.  There’s nothing more frustrating as a reader or tv viewer than to be left hanging.  You know how this feels. Don’t do it to your readers. Be sure you have answered all the story questions for an emotionally satisfying end.

Resolve The Plot Before The Romantic or Emotional Resolution

If you’ve done your job right, your main character will have changed or come to a realization about herself by the end of the book.  The emotional resonance of this revelation should follow the climactic sequence with the villain, if you have one. Or the external plot, if there’s no definitive bad guy. Perhaps the internal revelation prompted the action that led your heroine to the final conflict. Then have her reflect on it, change her direction in life, make a decision, or alter an important relationship with another character. Maybe it means accepting herself or shedding her guilt.

Each book in a series should affect the personal relationships in your character’s life. Nothing is static. People change based on their experiences. So should your characters, and it’s much more emotionally gratifying to your readers when this final declaration comes at the end.

In my Bad Hair Day mysteries, my hairdresser sleuth Marla Shore decides to date the handsome detective at the end of book one.  By the end of book nine, they’ve set a wedding date.  Yes, it’s taken them that long to get together because they’ve had a lot of issues to resolve. Each volume in the series offers a step forward in their relationship even though they might falter along the way. So, too, in Silver Serenade, my recent sci fi romance, the heroine agrees to marry the hero at the end and also realizes she might make a better intelligence officer than an assassin. These decisions come after she’s tested her skills and defeated the bad guy.  It wouldn’t have the same resonance before then because we’re still caught up in the tension of executing the external plot.  So after the adventure comes to a close, have your protagonist let us know how this has experience has changed her.

As a reader, what do you find most satisfactory or unsatisfactory about endings?

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Ten Tips for Blog Tours

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on August 17, 2010

Since I recently finished my own blog tour, I learned a few things along the road.  Here are some tips I’d like to share:

  1. Aim for popular blogs that get a lot of hits and slant your blog to their audience.
  2. Schedule up to three guest spots a week so you don’t clog the loops with your announcements.
  3. Plan to be available to answer comments all day when your post goes live.
  4. Publicize the blog tour on your social networks, website, and other sites.
  5. Include a short excerpt from your book with your post when possible.
  6. Add a buy link to your book along with links to your website, blog, FB page, and Twitter at the end of your post.
  7. Interviews as well as blogs draw attention.
  8. Consider offering a giveaway for commenters.
  9. Thank your host at the end of the day.
  10. For next time, write down blog topics as you write your WIP.  This way, you’ll have a ready list of topics available when you need them (i.e. notes on research, the writing process, what inspired you to write this story, world building, themes, etc.).

 What else would you add?

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CRIME ON CRUISE SHIPS

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on August 16, 2010

Besides the shenanigans that happen on the Tropical Sun, my fictional cruise ship in Killer Knots, real crimes take place on ships at sea. You’ve all read news articles about people who go overboard or go missing on ocean voyages. What about murders and rapes and robberies? 

 A cruise ship is like a city. You should take the same precautions there as anywhere. Don’t go alone into deserted parts of the ship. Keep your valuables locked up. Steer clear of areas with high winds and a single railing between you and the ocean, especially if you’ve been consuming alcohol. Be wary of strangers who come on to you. The crew are no exception. Don’t go off to uncharted territory with a crew member just because he’s cute.  You don’t know his background or his motivation.  Always get your own drinks. Don’t accept drinks from strangers or leave your drinks unattended.  Know where your children are and warn them to be cautious. Vacations are no place to let down your guard.

In many cases, jurisdiction over a shipboard crime is questionable. Lack of communication, overlapping authority, and poorly trained staff who don’t know how to collect evidence have been problems in solving crimes at sea. Plus it’s hard for local authorities to examine a crime scene when the ship is in port for one day and by then, days may have passed since the incident.

Fortunately, new laws aim to tighten standards. The Cruise Vessel Security and Safety Act of 2010 will require ships to install video surveillance in common areas plus door viewers and safety latches on cabin doors. Ships will need to carry kits to conduct sexual assault exams and to administer drugs that prevent STDs after an attack. They will need to log in all deaths, missing persons, assaults involving U.S. citizens, and other alleged crimes.  These reports will be available to the FBI and Coast Guard.

The FBI has jurisdiction if the ship is owned by a U.S. company, if the victim is a U.S. citizen on a ship departing or arriving at a U.S. port, if the crime takes place within 12 miles of our coastline, or if an act of terrorism against the U.S. is involved. 

You don’t want to become a cruise ship victim. Be as careful on vacation as you would be on shore, and you should have a great time.

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KAREN HAWKINS SPEAKS

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on August 14, 2010

NY Times bestselling author Karen Hawkins offered her advice this morning at the Florida Romance Writers meeting. Here are some of the guidelines she offered based on what she’s learned through the years as a professional writer.                           

  1. Don’t ignore the market unless you’re willing to wait for the market to swing around to what you want to write.  Write what you love and love the market, but stay true to your voice.  Find out where your voice will fit in the current marketplace.
  2. Don’t write for one editor. Write for the genre. Be broad enough so that your work has appeal.  (i.e. If you write to one editor’s tastes and she rejects your work, then where does that leave you?)
  3. Start a self-editing checklist.  If you’re hearing the same things over and over from contest feedback and critique partners, it’s time for you to listen.
  4. Treat writing as a business in terms of keeping ledgers, records of expenses, estimated tax payments, etc.
  5. You need at least four books in the same genre for readers to find you.  Don’t genre jump or jump on the new trend.  Every book you write should offer what readers expect from your brand.
  6. Be assertive. Stand up for yourself or get an agent who will do it for you. Don’t sell yourself short. There’s a lot more out there to ask for if you try.

We can learn from the mistakes other multi-published authors have made and the lessons they’ve learned, because we’ve all been down the same road at one time or another.

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LIBRARIES IN A DIGITAL WORLD

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on August 11, 2010

Will libraries become a relic of the past when books turn digital?  Like in a Dr. Who episode, will there be one vast library that’s a repository for the entire world, the sole remaining place holding dusty shelves? That was a cool couple of episodes with David Tennant starring, by the way. Think about the trees cut down to produce all that paper and where those once living trees might have come from. Anyway, will libraries, with reduced funding as an additional obstacle, still be viable ten years from now?                          Books

If you think of the library as a multi-media center, then I believe the answer is yes. Besides books, movies, and music, public libraries offer free classes on a variety of topics, meeting rooms, computer centers, literacy and outreach programs. And did you know you could order digital books from the library to download to your eReader?  You can probably research whatever you want by accessing library services online, too.

 A recent article in an AARP bulletin for seniors reports about how Queens Library in New York holds a phone-in discussion group twice a week.  Participants dial in at the prescribed times and chat about books, recipes, current events topics, history, and more. It’s a great way for people to keep in touch and have human contact when they can’t get about so easily. The library’s mail-in program supplies assisted living facilities and homebound individuals with reading materials, movies, and music.  These are great services for people who want to benefit from their local library but don’t have the means to get there.

It appears as though the role of the library in the future is to expand rather than to shrink. So donate your used books to your local library, join the Friends of the Library and support their fund-raisers, and give your librarian a big hug of appreciation for all her efforts.

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RWA 2010: Conclusion

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on August 9, 2010

REPORT ON RWA NATIONAL CONFERENCE

 Friday, July 30 and Saturday, July 31

Reinventing Yourself with bestselling author JAYNE ANN KRENTZ .

 Jayne had to reinvent herself numerous times, from writing futuristics to contemporaries to historicals.  She takes her “core story” and puts it into a marketable setting.  Names she’s written under are Jayne Ann Krentz, Amanda Quick, and Jayne Castle.

Jayne Ann Krentz

Jayne Ann Krentz

“Sooner or later, you will have to reinvent yourself.”  Jayne offered three rules for writers to heed:                                      

1.  Identify your core story: conflicts, relationships, archetypes, and themes that appeal to you as a writer.  Keep it fresh over time.  Writers who want to survive must be able to adapt.

2.   Know the market.  Be familiar with subgenres and where your core story fits in.

3.  Understand the importance of fictional landscape to readers. Each genre requires a particular landscape with conventions and reader expectations.  Adjust your core story to fit that landscape.

I went to a couple of workshops on Digital Publishing.  With so many Epubs popping up, writers are cautioned to evaluate them before submitting their work. Look at such things as cover art, frequency of releases, cover copy, and genre.  Read a few of their books to see how well they’re edited and if you like them. Be wary of too many releases at once because titles can get lost in the crowd and there won’t be any standout successes. The same goes for your own schedule. Readers can get overwhelmed if you release too many titles in succession. Space them out by at least 8 weeks.

 Digital pubs may pick up a series started elsewhere and may be interested in putting your backlist into digital format. The benefits of going with a digital pub instead of doing it on your own?

  • Editing
  • Cover Art
  • Promotional Tools
  • Established Reader Base

ANGELA JAMES gave a spotlight on Carina Press.  She spoke on how to submit to this digital first imprint and what they do in terms of online marketing.

Career Planning in a Changing Environment 

Issues important to authors were discussed in this seminar with agents KRISTIN NELSON, STEVE AXELROD, and KAREN SOLEM.

  •  Do we want to release simultaneously in print and in ebook?  Do ebooks cannabilize other sales?
  • Make sure you’re covered if your contract is cancelled arbitrarily (i.e. so you don’t have to pay back your advance)
  • 25% of net versus 25% of retail price—the former is harder to track.  Ebook royalty rates are still in a flux.  Consider renegotiating your current contracts re ebook royalties.
  • Classic publishing model strengths are turning into weaknesses
  • Independent bookstores are in trouble and that will jeopardize hardcover sales
  • Publishers are trying to control all rights that may come down the road someday
  • New opportunities for authors are out there.  In between print books, you could publish novellas or short stories in digital format.  You can bring your own out of print books back to life on the digital platform.
  • The biggest question is still how to get your work noticed.
  • Authors are forging direct connections with fans through social networking. The challenge here is balancing the time requirements with writing the next book.
  • If your career isn’t moving forward, it’s time to diversify.  Consider writing a bigger book. Do what you always do but in a different way.  If you decide to write in more than one genre, ask yourself if you have time, if you are prolific enough, and if publishing in more than one genre will cannibalize your own sales.

 Fight Scenes with popular author Angela Knight was a very useful workshop. I’m not going to repeat what she said here except to say I scribbled notes the entire time.  She could have used another hour to complete her presentation and have a Q&A session but what she said was helpful. Some of it was common sense like save your biggest fight scene and worst villain for last. She offered some great ideas which hopefully I can deploy.

I also attended Publisher Booksignings and collected lots of free books signed by the authors. These are great for keeping up with what’s current in a genre.  The Carina Press open house with cocktails and snacks was also fun.

Alyssa Day

Paranormal Romance Author Alyssa Day

Ann Aguirre

Science Fiction Author Ann Aguirre

The RITA and Golden Heart Awards Dinner and Ceremony was Saturday night. Everyone dressed up and excitement was in the air as we prepared to hear who’d won these prestigious awards.

RITA Awards Dinner

RITA Awards Dinner

RITA Awards Dinner

Sharon Hartley, Nancy Cohen, Allison Chase

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 The Food
 What are those weird purple vegetables on the plate?

The Gathering was Friday night.  This was the FF&P (Fantasy, Futuristic, & Paranormal chapter of RWA) Steampunk Ball and Prism Awards with music provided by bestselling science fiction author CATHERINE ASARO.  This took place at the Swan Resort, a short walk from the adjacent Dolphin. At the buffet, we had a choice of Roast Beef and Chicken, various salads, poached potatoes, roasted vegetables, and delectable desserts. The room was decorated with style and many of the folks dressed up in period attire.  It was fun watching the costume contest and meeting so many new people. This is definitely an event I’d attend again. Kiss of Death chapter also has a chocolate party that’s fun if you belong to that chapter.

The Gathering

The Gathering

Lizzie Newell

Author Lizzie Newell

 PRISM Award Winners:

Dark Paranormal: Immortal Danger by Cynthia Eden

Erotica: Secrets in Stone by Radclyff

Fantasy: The Strangely Beautiful Tale of Miss Percy Parker by Leanna Renee Hieber

Futuristic: Close Encounters by Katherine Allred

Light Paranormal: Secret Life of a Vampire by Kerrelyn Sparks and Wild Blue Under by Judi Fennell

Novella: Belong the Night by Cynthia Eden

Time Travel: Viking Heat by Sandra Hill

Steampunk Ball

Steampunk Ball

Congratulations to all!  It was a great conference.  I met many new friends whom I hope to see again at future events.

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RWA 2010: Day 2

Posted by Nancy J. Cohen on August 5, 2010

RWA NATIONAL CONFERENCE, ORLANDO 2010

Thursday, July 29

The morning’s annual RWA meeting was followed by a keynote luncheon featuring NY Times bestselling author Nora Roberts aka J.D. Robb. 

Nora Roberts

Nora Roberts signs her books

 NORA ROBERTS Keynote Luncheon

Nora spoke about how technology changed from when she started writing in the days of typewriters.  Writers used to go to the library for research, wrote letters by hand, and made phone calls on land line telephones.  RWA started in Houston in the early 1980s, and Nora’s friends from those early days stayed with her throughout life.  RWA provides networking and education and is a springboard for publishing. 

Even though technology has changed, there are more opportunities in romance today. She talked about how we have to stay in the pool and avoid excuses like it’s too cold or we’re too tired or there are too many people crowding the water.  Getting published is “supposed to be hard.  Hard is what makes it special.”  And regarding the value of RWA, “No one should have to face the hard alone.” 

Lunch

Lunch with Zelda Benjamin (left) and Sandra Madden (right)

 

Publisher Lou Aronica’s State of the Industry Address at the PAN Retreat

“Slightly down is the new up” in this economy.  Only a few bestselling titles sustain the publishing houses, according to veteran publisher Lou Aronica.  Sales at the bottom of the list are low, as in dozens of copies sold.  It’s very hard to sell a novel today even though many romance programs are fully sustainable.  Sales at Amazon are up while Barnes & Noble sales are flat and Borders is having problems.  Bookstores are in trouble like the CD music stores.  Barnes & Noble realizes their brick-and-mortar stores are in jeopardy because consumers prefer to buy books online.  Amazon buyers purchase books they are looking for in particular. The main problem there is that we cannot duplicate the bookstore browsing experience.  There’s no place for impulse buyers. Amazon tries with their “if you like this book, then you’ll like…” but they mostly recommend bestsellers.  Few readers are discovering new fiction online. 

 E-books are changing everything.  Few people estimate the speed of change.  It was predicted there would be 11 million ebook readers by the end of 2011 but we’ve already reached this level.  3 million iPads were sold by the end of last month.  Before Kindle hit the market at the end of 2007, a few e-reader devices were available but not many people were interested.  Now it’s a different story.  But with soaring e-book sales, consumers don’t want to spend more than $12.99 on an e-book.  This loss in sales revenue concerns publishers and bookstores.  Barnes & Noble is making an effort by allowing consumers to read ebooks for free in their stores and to preview books they see on the shelves that way.  Booksellers may promote the store as a social site for people to hang out, but if nobody buys print books from them, what then?  CD stores went out of business because listeners wanted to buy online.  Readers like the price and convenience of buying e-books online.  It eliminates the need for manufacturing, distribution, and returns.  This means a publisher could potentially make more money by selling an increased number of books for less.  However, marketing is critical because the browsing experience is lost.  Far more effort has to be put into marketing, plus ebook prices have to rise to return a profit.

Publishing to date has been a business-to-business industry.  It goes from publisher to bookseller to consumer.  Now, however, there is a business-to-consumer model, a demand market instead of an impulse market.  New books go unsold because readers know what they want when they go online.  Many publishers don’t have the staff, training, or interest in consumer marketing.  So authors have to take charge of marketing their own work.  As a writer, you need to find a community of readers specific to your book and market directly to them, but this requires time and money.  Social media is a necessity.  Book reviews used to drive sales and so did independent booksellers, but this is not the case anymore.  Bloggers fill this void.  Authors should reach out to bloggers who have a passion for reading.  Again, this can be very time consuming. 

 If no one is printing or distributing the book, why do we need a publisher?  Lou offers these reasons:

  • Editorial input
  • Advances
  • Marketing
  • Multimedia access

More niche publishers are yet to come with expertise in locating readers.  Connecting to individual readers will rise in importance.  Lou foresees a Renaissance and says it’s “a great age to be a writer.”

Lunch

Nancy Cohen, Allison Chase, Sharon Hartley

 Writing  in Multiple Subgenres: the Pros and Cons of Branching Out

Panel with authors ANN AGUIRRE, CYNTHIA EDEN, BETH KERY, ELISABETH NAUGHTON, JULIANA STONE, and BETH WILLIAMSON

I sat next to author LAURA BRADFORD who writes romance and mystery. It was nice to meet her. Panelist ANN AGUIRRE said she keeps her work fresh by writing in multiple genres.  She takes a week off between books.  She wanted to write a science fiction book women could enjoy and that inspired her popular Jax series.  She would not want to settle down writing just one genre.  CYNTHIA EDEN said she writes very fast and can do a draft in six weeks.  The advantage of writing in multiple genres is you can produce as many books as you want although you may need a pseudonym.  You can meet reader expectations in a new genre by writing with the same voice.  “Don’t be afraid” to try a new genre.  The cons of writing multiple genres are:

  • Fans may not cross over if they’re dedicated genre readers.
  • Multiple websites and promo may be necessary for pen names and this can get costly.  
  • Fans want you to stay in the genre they like.
  • It can dilute your brand.  You should be clear with your labeling on your website and other sites.
  • Your publishers may expect you to write two or more books a year.

One author suggests doing double-sided promo items to separate the genres which can save you money.  Connecting websites can be a way to attract crossover readers.  But heed this caveat: “The only thing worse than not selling is overselling.”  In other words, don’t overbook yourself when setting deadlines.  Allow time for vacations, edits, page proofs, blog tours, etc.  And just because Author X writes 10 pages a day doesn’t mean you have to produce the same.  Everyone is different.  Do what suits your lifestyle.

 Paranormals

Panel with authors KELLEY ARMSTRONG, JEANIENE FROST, TERRI GAREY, COLLEEN GLEASON, JULIANA STONE, and CHERYL WILSON

The panelists discussed the differences between paranormal romance and urban fantasy.  Paranormal romance has the happy ever after ending expected in the romance genre along with spin-off sequels, while urban fantasy employs first-person viewpoint and will have the same character recurrent in a series.  However, these lines are blurring as some PNRs may have recurring heroines and some UFs may be less gritty. One author defined fantasy as more Tolkien in scope, while PNR involved “things that go bump in the night.” Whatever the subgenre, world building rules must be consistent.  We may be seeing more stories based on mythology because this is still a “rich area to mine.” 

The panelists spoke about their world building process.  One author first defines her forces of conflict, i.e., good versus evil.  Then she goes from the macro level down to the micro level starting with government and ending with daily life.  What is unique about your world must be essential to your story.  What does the culture value the most and what will they do to protect it? 

Our last workshop on Thursday finished at 5:30.  We headed off for drinks at the bar with our FRW pals: President KRISTIN WALLACE, KATHLEEN PICKERING, ONA BUSTOS, MICHAEL MEESKE, MONA RISK, CAROL STEPHENSON, DEBBIE ANDREWS, and more. Publicist JOAN SCHULHAFER stopped by to say hello. So did CFRW members DARA EDMONSON aka WYNTER DANIELS and CFRW prez LORENA STREETER.  Then we all split to find dinner.

More workshop writeups coming over the weekend.  Hit the Subscribe button if you want to stay informed about new posts.

Disclaimer: These workshop reports are based on my notes and are subject to my interpretation. 

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Prize drawing from August commenters at all my blogging sites for a free signed book from my personal backlist collection, your choice of paranormal/futuristic romance or Bad Hair Day mystery.

Friday, August 6: I’ll be blogging on Secrets and Suspense at http://coffeetimeromance.com/CoffeeThoughts/

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